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that alabama could vote for lyndon johnson and the newly registered black voters would have people to vote for and couldn't just go to but also run for office said that as who's lifework and he was very much committed to recapturing the greatness of african-americans in terms of political participation and he was in the area of construction because his grandfather had been a reconstruction legislator and he grew up hearing about his grandfather while he was coming of age and a radicalized him to be living under jim crow in alabama while hearing about the fact black people used to have political power and be in office including his own family. >> who was he? >> he was my great grandfather, handsome man, isn't he? she was the first black lawyer in the state of alabama and architect of reconstruction. i grew up listening to my father repeat this over and over. as a teenager my eyes would roll and in this book i go off in search of the source of my father's passion and find the outline but he was admitted in 1878 -- >> to the alabama barp? >> not the first but the fourth colored lawyer in the
of north and europe primarily. all of asia and all of africa were excluded. in 1965 when lyndon johnson got the voting rights act fruity got to congress and said he got them on their backs now, we have got to open up the world. he revealed the national origins act which was a racial hierarchy their reserved 85% of immigration for people to become citizens to three countries, england, ireland and germany. he repealed that and made in a first-place first serve system for the 4 world for legal immigrants. he went to the statue of liberty, the dance that never again will the twin barriers of prejudice and privilege shatter the gate to freedom. and unconsciously, over not quite 50 years we have communities from all over the world. you go to a naturalization ceremony, of the most inspiring things you will ever see, we have korean communities, alien communities, people from all over the world, all over america, no foreigner too foreign to become a fellow citizen. we are not only the pioneer democracy in the world in building our constitution around an idea, but the only one that has followed throu
or a passage saying martin luther king called up lyndon johnson nervous as hell that the whole alliance that they build was going to be undermined by the vietnam war. i described the conversation and then there's and hell happened. you can click command you can hear martin luther king talk to lyndon johnson on the telephone. this is an enhanced -- and enhanced the-book. i have no idea what the market is for it. the publisher hardly knows anything about it because there were kind of assembling it. there's a lot of panic in the book business these days. but i'm glad that they did it. this is novel. it would have probably taken them 100 years to get around to something as novel as an enhanced e-book. they are doing it. i don't know how we will work. tomorrow in baltimore i am teaching a similar builds around this short book. i have taught it before at other schools, chapel hill, my alma mater last night meeting from baltimore. this time it is different in two respects, built around the shorter books and there will have a similar in front of me and online from all of the country and even ou
. this is the night, of course, when president lyndon baines johnson in his texas drawl said live on national tv "we shall overcome." >> mr. speaker, mr. president, members of the congress, i speak tonight for the dignity of man and the destiny of democracy. at times history and fate meet at a single time in a single place to shape a turning point in man's unending search for freedom. so it was at lexington and concord. so it was a century ago at appomattox. so it was last week in selma, alabama. what happened in selma is part of a far larger movement which is in every section and state of america. it is the effort of american negroes to secure for themselves the full blessings of american life. their cause must be our cause too. because it's not just negroes, but really it's all of us who must overcome the crippling legacy of bigotry and injustice. and we shall overcome. every american citizen must have an equal right to vote. every device of which human ingenuity is capable has been used to deny this right. the negro citizen may go to register only to be told that the day is wrong, or the hour is
. instead, on that fateful november day, lyndon baines johnson was sworn in as the 36th president of the united states. johnson pursued kennedy's economic proposals and pushed the tax plan through congress. how well did it work? perfectly. business week, which isn't exactly a liberal pro-kennedy publication, said it probably was the most successful tax cut in history. it came out of the textbooks. it went back into the textbooks as the fiscal measure that came closer to carrying out what people had projected for it. that was a tax cut that worked. the economic policies of the kennedy-johnson administration had stimulated demand, creating growth in the economy. busiss was boomi. jobs were plentiful, unemployment near an all-time low. but many observers, including the president's council of economic advisors, were concerned about the appearance of inflatio as the economy heated up. [james duesenberry] t in965, the real aggregate demand was sing [james duesenberry] t in965, it was continuing to rise into 1966. tthe ringed the raw materials ices,zation, and the decline in unemployment
is the king of them all. so there's a little bit of a -- um, lyndon johnson had some nice ones, but lyndon johnson picked up a couple -- again, i'm using every authority i can find, but lyndon johnson, i'm sure he picked this up from jazz or something, pressing the flesh was a johnsonnism. i'll be down there pressing the flesh. and ladybird gets credit for motorcade. that doesn't exist before she comes up with motorcade, and it's picked up by "time" magazine. there's no at least written example of that being used before that. richard nixon has some nice ones. he, depending on your point of view, but silent majority is his, expletive deleted is really a coinage either of he or his speech writers when they're actually going over the records of the watergate, they use the term. instead of saying censored or bleeped, they used expletive deleted which became its own sort of curse word. another one which was very interesting at the time, created quite a stir was when he talked about, started talking about winding down the war and winding down seemed to be sort of a, you know, we're winding up, y
, lyndon johnson met in atlantic city, and in the chapter i have here, had secretly, and, to me, it's amazing this is not more news. i've written it detailed as i can. he had a nervous breakdown because he's trying to have two little delegates from mississippi and to seat all of the regular white democrats from mississippi who were publicly pledged to vote for goldwater. the democratic delegates were pledged to vote for goldwater, and most of them started switching parties instandpointly, but he wanted to seat them anyway. the mississippi freedom democrats, they walked out because they didn't think it was fair. carl sanders, in one of the conversations, you can hear, and john conley, called lyndon johnson saying if you let those two symbolic seats there, the whole south will walk out of this convention because you will be turning the democratic party over to the negroes and letting martin luther king decide who can be a democrat. johnson almost has a breakdown on the phone there, and he basically went to bed for several days saying i'm going to quit, i can't handle this. i'm trying
samaritan hospital in downtown selma. just eight days later, president lyndon johnson introduced the voting rights act, and later, on august 6th, 1965, he signed that act into law. >> that was congressman john lewis, democrat of georgia who led the march on the edmund pettus bridge in selma that day in 1965. he was speaking about that experience today on the steps of the supreme court. as the conservative majority on the court seemed to indicate a willingness to at least considering dismantling the pilars of the voting rights act first passed in 1965 in the aftermath of that violent day in selma. congressman john lewis, it's such an honor to have you here. >> thank you so much for having me here. i'm honored to be here. >> that is crazy, because it is intimidating to talk about this history knowing that you are here, able to tell it yourself. and when we are thinking about the voting rights act being at risk, it brings into very sharp relief how very hard-fought it was. i hope you don't mind me asking you about some of the history. when a week after you were beaten so badly on that bridge i
on this valentine's day with love letters from president lyndon johnson to bride to be-- lady bird. >reading them tught, ese are beautiful, these are wonderful. that's exactly sort of thing that we all would like to receive. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: two major airlines announced a marriage of sorts, on this valentine's day. their combination means the field of major u.s. carriers will shrink by one. these jetliners-- sporting shiny new paint jobs-- are among the roughly 900 planes in the american airlines fleet and they're about to be joined by the 6
people in lyndon johnson's's administration than martin luther king. but when the books come out and i try to talk to people, anybody that's read it, some of my most inspirational responses have been from older white men. women are better quite frankly. [laughter] but what we get something from a white man, it is all the more to it and in the movement is basically run by women as long as there wasn't a microphone. but that is just a truism of history and to some degree it is still true. i don't know how that will survive the digital age when they can do a lot of stuff just for their computer and they don't have to go out. >> man, before you leave, please come down here. i would like to answer your question. >> i was a young man in my thirties during the civil rights movement the constant chez my feelings that i kept my mouth shut. i think i'm not unique in this group. there was an intellectual debate that went on, discussion america and the issue of property rights versus civil rights and it's a heated the date among my friends but i want you to know that i'm ashamed. [applause] >> tha
, and handed over to them. that senior lyndon johnson met in atlantic city, in the chapter i have here, to me it's amazing this is not more news. i have written in detail as i can, he had a nervous breakdown because he's trying to do little delegates from mississippi, and to see all the regular white democrats from mississippi who would publicly pledge to vote for goldwater, the democratic delegates said they would vote for goldwater, and most of them started switching party instantly but he wanted to defeat them anyway. and the mississippi freedom democrats, they walked out because they didn't think it was fair. and karl sanders and one of the conversations you can hear, and john connally, called lyndon johnson and told them if you would even let those two symbolic, the whole south will walk out of this convention because you will be turning the democratic party over to the negro, and letting martin luther king decide who can be a democrat. and johnson almost has a breakdown on the phone there, and basically went to bed for several days and said i'm going to quit. i can't handle this. i'm tr
it tree troll against chuck hagel. is it about lyndon johnson's inability to win that war or end it? what is it that burns so deeply in john mccain today? for some reason he wants to play it again and again in iraq and afterno afghanistan and again in iran. we look at the resentment burning in john mccain's heart. it's not against george w. bush and his political henchmen who tried to stay mccain's reputation in 2000 but a guy who fear and rallied against wounds just like he did. chuck hagel, a nightmare, by the way, whose flashbacks must haunt still the heart still of john sydney mccain. both are msnbc analysts. both of you, sir, and lady, are younger than me, but i must tell you i'm absolutely convinced we're watching a flashback. watch this. he did a long angry windup before he launched into his first so-called question which was really an indictment. it included putdowns as well as references to vietnam. let's listen. >> in january of 2007 in a rather bizarre exchange with secretary rice in the foreign relations committee after some nonsense about syria and crossing the border into ir
. franklin roosevelt was moved by later movements. lyndon johnson had the civil rights movement. i think we begin with that. this book comes out at a moment when the country sees the power and possibility of occupy, 99%, and how that has shifted. it is still evolving. it has shifted the center of political gravity of our dialogue. the issue has been off the radar for so long. >> roosevelt surfed and harnessed those movements. he used them to get legislation passed to initiate programs. obama is still getting on his wet suit. to read the essay she wrote in 2008, there was a sense of exhibits -- exuberance. you say that hope is not optimism that expects things to turn out well. it seems like he confused those two things. >> i will come back to what i write about in the book. the expectations were so great and high. go back to 2008. the back to the election and year when we are fortunate region were fortunate enough to be living with debates that were not cruel reality shows. every week, there were debates among the democratic candidates. barack obama embodied change. it seemed he brought into
claimed america's highest office. lyndon johnson was going away. he had not won and would not win. >> i shall not seek and will not accept the nomination from my party for another term as president. >> reporter: just a fraction of the carnage that was yet to come. yet america's military leaders still insisted they were in control and that the war was going well. fanning the flames of protest back home even more. on an august visit to san francisco's precido, westmoreland was still optimistic even after the tet offensive six months earlier. >> i do not give the military, and if he attacks again he will suffer terrible casualties as he did in tet and adds he did in may when he attempted to make headlines in order to influence public opinion. >> reporter: in 1968 the enterprise sailed home from vietnam, with families reunited the war seemed way off. the war was still a steak driven between them and their country. the war would not end until seven years. that is segment two for tonight. >>> when saigon fell it created refugees. known as boat people they overcame grueling conditions on their
, and was founded by president lyndon johnson. the program is currently suspending enrollment for at least the next five months. the department of labor says it attempted to reduce operating costs, but the savings were not enough. the department tells us: 'job corps is conducting an exhaustive review of its current operating costs in order to make changes to ensure that program costs are sustainable in the future." a massive strike of india's workforce is expected to begin today. trade unions are organizing the strike, which includes millions of workers from the country's banking and manufacturing sectors, among others. workers are calling for a higher minimum wage and better implementation of the country's labor laws. it's expected the strikes will ripple through the indian economy. gdp could take a hit of about 200 billion rupees, which translates to 3.7 billion u.s. dollars. car sales are in a slump in europe. europeans in several nations are hitting the brakes on buying cars as austrity measures translate into high unemployment and recession. new car registrations fell to 8.7% in january, the l
government. >> big government. >> this is the most progovernment speech since lyndon johnson. >> stephen: yes, i find it offensive that the head of our government would give a speech to everyone else in the government that was so pro-government. [ laughter ] not to mention, the president immediately declared war on the private sector. >> tonight, let's declare that in the wealthiest nation on earth, no one who works full time should have to live in poverty and raise the federal minimum wage to $9 an hour. >> >> stephen: $9? that is almost two feet of sandwich. where does it end? where did it end? a living wage spoils the working man. just ask c.e.o. and fox news resident smeagol robert luddy. jim? >> i worked for $85 cents an hour when i was in high school and i was happy to have that job. >> stephen: that's what i'm talking. america has gone soft. if everyone is living the fantasy life of cold and heat they'll have no drive. it's that suffering that lifts people up to start their own business and one day become a job creator like mr. luddy who lobbies to fight against raising the minimum wag
'ses will be released. the lyndon b. johnson lube brar rewill post it at 9:00 a.m. 1934 on their first date lyndon johnson proposed. they spent the next two months getting to know each other through nearly 90 love letters and got married at the end of all of that. >> following his saturdtate of union address the president is on the road pushing his economic plans. he is facing harsh opposition. >> a stop near atlanta today. he will keep having to come back to the economy. the president toured a factory in north carolina touting what he says is a manufacturing come back for the u.s. economy and pushing the idea that he outlined his state of the union address. more money for preschool education. >> i talked about making sure kids get early high school education. make sure our high schools are preparing children for high-tech economy. >> with high sky the national debt growing larger and larger additional spending will be difficult to get through congress. the white house may be making a strategic decision that there is no political benefit from focusing on debt and deficits. republicans say the plan
in letters from president lyndon johnson to the woman he wanted to marry. released today by the l.b.j. presidential library in austin, texas, the more than 90 letters showed the impatience of a man so taken by claudia alta "lady bird" taylor that he proposed the day after they met in september 1934. and just weeks later, he wrote: to which she replied: in audio recorded in 1978, lady bird johnson described her dilemma at the time. >> i was almost perfect willing to say let's be sure we get married in a year, but he would say that no, if you wait that long, if you don't love me enough to marry me now., you won't a year from now, it will be enough to keep me in a turmoil and make life unbearable for a long time and then well slip away some how. >> woodruff: johnson's persistence paid off, after a two-and-a-half month courtship, the couple wed in november 1934 and remained married for 39 years, until his death in 1973. for more on these letters as intimate portraits of a president and first lady, we turn to lyndon and lady bird johnson's granddaughter catherine robb and presidential
of that music. or in a passage saying martin luther king called lyndon johnson nervous that the whole line they built was owing to be undermined by the vietnam war and i describe in the conversation and how it happened, you can click and you're martin luther king talked to lyndon johnson on the telephone. this is an enhanced matte -- and enhanced e-book. i have no idea what the market is for. the publisher are hurting us anything about it because they were assembling and there's a lot of panic in the book business these days. but i'm glad they did it. this is novel. it probably would've taken him an hundred years to get around some famous novelist and enhanced e-book and now they are doing a. i don't now how it will work. tomorrow in baltimore and teaching a seminar built around this short boat. i've taught it before at other schools. i taught at chapel hill, my alma mater last spring. this time is different in two respects. it will be built around the shorter boat was reading to the others, too. i'll have people online from all over the country and even around the world auditing this clas
. caller: my favorite president has to be lyndon johnson. look what he did for civil rights not only for americans but for everybody in this country. he fought through the garage of our southern states, and he got it through. -- fought through the brage of our southern states. lyndon johnson said, "when i sign these proclamations, i am turning the south over to the republican party." the city just agreed with the emancipation proclamation. this is in 2013. lyndon johnson fought for all americans. i was debating whether it should be johnson or jimmy carter. jimmy carter, in the final history of this country is written, jimmy carter will be among the best up there, not ronald reagan. look what jimmy carter did, by holding to signing treaties with panama, he gave the panama canal back to the panamanians. george bush's father arrested noriega and put him in jail. thank you. host: the washington post editorial page weighs in on the question -- who gets the washington post this morning on past presidents. iowa, democratic caller, lisa. caller: good morning. president roosevelt. he was the
't? is it about lyndon johnson's inability to win the war or end it? what is it about john mccain that seems to excite those who know nothing about vietnam. well tonight we dig into the deep well of resentment burning in john mccain's patriotic heart. a resentment not against the north vietnamese who imprisoned and tortured him, not against george w. bush and his political henchmen who tried to stain mccain's reputation. but just like he did, in the same army of america's long nightmare in vietnam. i'm joined by david corn with "mother jones" and joy reed with the grio. i have to tell you i'm convinced we're watching a flashback. watch this, here's senator john mccain, he did a long, angry wind-up before he launched into his first so-called question. it was really an indictment for former senate colleague and former friend and fellow vietnam veteran, chuck hagel. it included put-downs, as well as reference does vietnam. let's listen. >> in january of 2007, in a rather bizarre exchange with secretary rice in the foreign relations committee after some nonsense about syria and crossing the bord
lives and who dies. look, lyndon johnson picked out targets on which we dropped bombs in vietnam. fdr and truman what entire cities we would wipe out there. >> was no review or committee or anything else. >> bill: but that was declared war? >> as the declared war. what we have is the authorization for the use of force three-days after 9/11 which in the gulf war and is in the iraq war is the modern equivalent of a declaration of war. you do that and we declare who the enemy was. people who did 9/11 and all those who harbored or abetted them and that declaration.... >> bill: do you think if mitt romney had been elected president, i think he would have continued the drone program, do you think there would have been as much conservative opposition if republicans were dropping the drones as opposed to obama, isn't this about obama? >> no, i don't. i think its principled opposition. these are people who worry about the extent of the power of government. it would have been the same in bush administration. the real hypocrisy is the liberals. if this had been the bush administration dropping d
lyndon johnson pushed congress to pass the voting rights act, these states, most in the south, have been forced to get ok -- an ok from the justice department before changing any voter laws. when the 2012 election, six of those states passed restrictions on voting like requiring picture i.d. cards. under the voting rights act federal courts struck down the photo i.d. laws in texas and south carolina. those southern states will tell the supreme court the special voting protection is no longer needed in the age of obama. obama himself disagrees. listen to how they put it in his race speech in 2008. >> the legacy of discrimination and current incidents of discrimination while less overt than in the past, that these things are real. and must be addressed. by enforcing our sism rights laws and ensuring -- civil rights laws and ensuring fairness in our criminal justice system. chris: as it happens we have two journalists who are also lawyers. and they have agreed to preview the supreme court arguments coming up wednesday. howard, you're the challenger. you present the southern states' argument
: when he signed the voting rights act in 1965 president lyndon johnson called it a triumph for freedom. it had been a century since the civil war and constitutional amendments extending the right to vote to former slaves and granting equal protection of laws. but in someplaces in the south, states had imposed barriers like poll tax and literacy tests making it harder for african-americans to vote. >> morality cannot be legislated but behavior can be regulated. >> for the past half century the voting rights act has been a tool for the federal government to prevent racial discrimination. now the supreme court is reviewing section five of the act which requires all or part of 16 states to obtain justice department approval before changing voting laws or maps. some states like 58 bam-- alabama where the case originated say section 5 is an outdated burden, that discrimination is scattered and limited. >> let us vote. >> but the ex-defenders say it is as relevant as ever. they site recent state laws limiting early voting while requiring voters to get government issued photo i.d.s. attorney g
was first adopted signed by lyndon johnson in 1965, renewed again by congress in 2006. >> that's correct. >> bill: so shelby county says what, we should be able to discriminate against blacks if we want to? >> that the south has changed so much we no longer need the voting rights act. it was a good law when passed. it was needed at that time. they admit freely they were bad actors in 1965 but they argue that oh, now things have changed so much that we no longer need the federal supervision of what we do. >> bill: particularly is -- revolves around section five, correct? as i understand. section five requires what? >> section five requires that places like shelby county which have a long and illustrious history -- nine states states and parts of eight more. parts of 17 states have coverage. places where there is a history of voting rights discrimination have to get what's called preclearance by either the department of justice or a federal court. and what that means is basically they can't just change the voting places right before an election. they can't just change the voting rules. the
letters between lyndon johnson and lady bird johnson will be available for the public to read. nearly 100 letters were written by the couple during their two month court ship back in 1934. they're going to go on display at the presidential library in austin. >>> it doesn't matter how old you are, valentine's day is a holiday everyone can enjoy. >> absolutely with that being said your age can determine your definition of love on this valentine's day. some young philosophers actually give some insight as to what they call love. >> valentine's day -- my daddy. >> chocolate. and high heels. >> i love my dad. >> and i like cool things like my dad. >> wait a minute. dad, candy dad. dad. i don't know -- what about the moms? >> these kids also gave their thoughts on what they thought date night was. answers to that coming up this morning at 5:00. >>> so we are feeling the love with the weather department. because the snow was not so bad. i know lynette a lot only people wanted et but not to ruin all their plans. >> it didn't. it came through and was out of near morning. we have to deal with this
government came back down after raids but since thenment it shot straight up. lyndon johnson said government can cure poverty and the experts know how and we created welfare payments so government grow but now those programs that need investment didn't work americans for lifting themselves out of poverty and their own on government was small but then big t government stepped in and progress stopped we taught people to be dependent the bourse stayed for. bill clinton put this on a better track through spending he did not want totaugt reform, republicans force timber that was good and the economy grew and we balanced the budget to a sustainable future but then-presidentbig bush happened 90,000 new regulators and new social programs he created a whole new cabinet departments and bail out banks and car companies that i was elected and i need a ladder. now we're back to $20,000 per personm $80,000 is what we spend but i'm getting0. dizzy we cannot pay for people who retire so this week i had an epiphany what is wrong with spending in the clinton years? widely need to spend so much more? we do not
carve it. so i did that as well and it's not as large as lyndon johnson's but nonethelenonethele ss, it is there. i had another story but i didn't know until my grandchildren were touring the senate a couple of months ago and they were taken to the old senate chamber which is where senate luncheon steak place. the guide very kindly pointed out, you have to look very carefully but my name is engraved on the top of the desk of one of the desks in the and the only senate chamber and it occurred most likely when we were voting for a leader and somebody had a piece of paper and just press down too hard and it actually carved right there on the top. i don't know who that was, so i'm privileged to say i have had my name carved a couple of times >> have you observed any changes of congressional mood following mayor bloomberg's pro-gun control that has charged incumbent members of congress and in general what you think is the current sensing congress on what is going to be done about gun control issues? >> i must say that i only wish that we could be more optimistic about our ability to addr
of the republicans? there are people who say obama is not a lyndon johnson. he doesn't know how to maneuver. >> i think he has learned a great deal during his first term. i don't want to sound patronizing in saying that. i've learned a great deal from watching his first term. but i think you already see a greater depth and sophistication in his approach. i also think you are seeing on the gun issue, on the immigration issue, on the fiscal cliff issue a new wariness by republicans of the fire brands in their ranks who just want to stop everything. and i think that there is a new awareness that the american people don't want grid lock. they don't want sclerosis. they don't want this hyperpartisanship. and one thing i think that president obama has demonstrated is an ability to reach across the aisle to try to invite more cooperation, but he's now tempering that with a new firmness, as we saw on the fiscal cliff that i think will serve him in good step. >> al gore, always a pleasure. >> thank you. >>> and we will be back. [ man ] i've been out there most of my life. you name it...i've hooked it. but
you to not talk about subjects. he was a formidable credit and adversary of lyndon johnson and jack kennedy on vietnam. massachusetts,-- boston college, irish catholic, all of that -- what brought you to admire him? >> he had -- he was a stranger to self-importance. that was important to me. not forgetting where you came from, and he was a stranger to self-importance. ira member -- i remember -- the funniest thing that happened, he said, i am sitting up there, my secretary comes in and said, mr. speaker, anderson is on the phone. i said, i will be honest with you -- he is a fellow from the old neighborhood and things have not worked out every well for him. so why take the call. how are you? he says, i am in a bar in somerville. i am with a couple of guys, and they do not believe i know you. they said, eddie, great old pal -- would you just tell these guys? so he puts them on the phone -- eddie is a great pal of mine. this is tip o'neill at, and so forth. he says, eddie, is there anything else i can do? he says, we are just proud of you. we see you on c-span. i have to tell you, you
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 201 (some duplicates have been removed)